SOC Technology: Reaping the Benefits of a Security Operations Center 

SOC Technology: Reaping the Benefits of a Security Operations Center 

Enterprise security is essential to a company’s overall physical security and data security plan. Meeting today’s ever-changing security risks has driven more and more businesses to transform standard, segregated security systems into a centralized solution with an in-house security operations center (SOC).

Security Operations Center (SOC)

SOC technology furnishes companies with a distinctive perspective of the organization’s security status and needs that helps lay out a clearly defined, business-specific plan to address distinct physical security and data security requirements. Instituting a SOC requires scrupulous planning that takes both physical and digital security into consideration.

A SOC is expected to comprise several areas including an operational room, a “war room” and supervisory offices. Every area is designed to provide efficiency, visibility, and control to facilitate continuous monitoring for detecting, preventing, and analyzing security incidents. Both SOC technology and well-defined processes and procedures are key to deploying and operating successfully.

SOC Technology

SOC technology allows organizations to take a more proactive, business-based approach to security, risk mitigation and management strategies. Establishing an effective SOC to identify the specific actions necessary to keep an enterprise protected at any point in time can be tricky, and requires an experienced and skilled security manager and security team.

Depending on the size of the company, it’s important to plan early for growing the security team with the enterprise, establish an effective SOC security program, and anticipate challenges that may arise as you scale.

SecOps, NetOps and physical security vulnerabilities

Many companies underestimate their vulnerability to well-funded attacks. However, the increasing pace and complexity of criminal threats to corporations both nationally and globally can no longer be ignored. Organizations that have yet to integrate their SecOps, NetOps and physical security operations are particularly vulnerable. With each department tasked with different objectives and managing individual budgets, businesses are susceptible to conflicts that can lead to cracks in the overall security plan—cracks that attackers can and will exploit.

A SOC helps organizations coordinate fragmented security departments under a single executive manager to ensure that all three are united by shared goals, and all elements of the security program are working together. Until that happens, the likelihood of criminal attempts to attack is high, the reason being that in a siloed corporate structure, communication between teams may be scant or even non-existent. One department may never even learn of another department experiencing an attack, which would raise an alert to check their own systems. On the other hand, teams that collaborate and communicate under one security manager are far more likely to learn when security has been compromised and take steps to protect all systems.

When the security team is coordinated, the company can also save on expenses as teams leverage each other’s investments. For example, if IT wants to purchase a new, next-generation firewall that fails to provide features the physical security team needs, they can select and deploy one that does. With one executive overseeing all departments, the company doesn’t end up purchasing separate solutions when one could work universally. Security is tighter, and time and resources are saved.

 

 

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